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AKHUNTER

recruit thought process

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I have been reading guys talking about what goes through a recruits mind when being recruited. There are MANY issues that surely are considered, certainly $$, what type of degree one is interested in, coaches, environment, the list is long.

Where I have an issue is I can not believe, as others seemingly do, that today's wrestlers are intimidated by who is already on the roster or might end up on the roster comes into play much. When I was being recruited that simply never entered my mind. And, I find it hard to believe, with the vast experience most kids enter the college domain today, that they run from other quality wrestlers.

I say if you are good you want to wrestle with other quality wrestlers, as much as you can.

I am sure the Haines situation will come up. But as I understand it he didn't have an offer on the table. What he may have thought or was told by Cael WE have no idea.

Thoughts?

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Idk if I would say new recruits are scared of who is on the roster, but I guarantee they do a little research on the teams depth chart before making a decision. IMO it would be dumb not to. I find it hard to believe that Johnny Hendricks being on the OK State roster, had no effect on Mark Perry not wrestling for his uncle. I actually know it had a huge effect.

 

This isn't solely on the recruits though either. The coach has to want you and if he has a 4 year starter penciled in at a weight chances are he isn't gonna throw much money at you to be a 4 year back up. Depth is great but with only so much scholarship money to go around it can make it hard to stockpile talent on top of talent.

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Could be......but if Perry wanted to run from Hendricks he didn't show it when he came back to that weight. Also if a coach doesn't want you I don't think he is going to spend the effort to recruit you.

No doubt scolly money is tight in wrestling. But it has been that way for a loooooooong time and the better teams still get some stockpiling done.

enjoyed reading your thoughts ocho....

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I am by no means an expert on this but it makes a huge difference if you are a top ten recruit or not I would say. If you are one of the many kids in the nation hoping to wrestle D1 you need to see what the team has to offer you. School, location, reputation, do they build good wrestlers or just recruit them....... Along with that would be; are there good wrestlers to push me, and is my weight going to even be an option. Teams will not recruit you if they do not think you will help, but there are also schools who will recruit you because you "might" fit and if you don't, go somewhere else. Plus no matter how good these recruits are, many are still kids moving away from home, and wrestling at a whole different level. Any amount of security is helpful. Recruiting isn't always about getting the best wrestlers, (maybe it is for top ten teams), but it is also about getting kids that fit into your team.

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I believe there are many factors, including (but not limited to);

scholarship money

location

degree choices

friendships (are there kids on the team I have befriended over the years)

coaches

program "fit" (culture-wise, does my attitude and value system match the program's)

wrestling opportunity (will I start right away, or be behind a potentially better wrestler)

wrestling for a winner (there IS value to being in an Iowa, Ok St, PSU or other winning "rooms")

future consideration (does the school have an training center for freestyle)

 

The way kids grow at varying rates, I'm not sure having someone in a "predicted" weight class should stop a blue-chipper if they are being recruited by a certain school, unless there's an absolute logjam of kids and I want to ensure I start. This may be a tie-breaker when looking at more than one school.

 

The Thomas Haines situation is different in that, going heavyweight, there's not an option in avoiding Nevills, also a hwt. All other weightclass kids could go up or down to get a shot at the line-up. I'm not saying one would win over the other, I really don't know, but the choice is limited.

 

Lastly, a program isn't built on 10 blue-chippers. There's normally 30-40 kids in a room, all different skill levels. Some start right away, some will never start, but all are important. The top recruits normally have more options, and scholly money would be more a part of their consideration, but if they're being recruited, the coaches have a plan for them. Since it's limited to 9.9, a program can't afford to go after too many kids in the same weight range.

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http://www.orangepower.com/threads/mark ... boy.45226/

 

Here is a thread with a lot of speculation as to what went on during Mark Perry's decision to choose Iowa.

 

In an interview I have heard Perry state that he wanted to do his own thing, believed inwhat Iowa was doing, and he also acknowledged the wrestlers on the OSU roster. I think it was one of the original Flowrestling videos. I will try to locate it and see if my memory is holding up.

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Though we are not a four year program, we've been through the recruiting process a little bit and have a little insight into the thought process of kids and their families.

 

The number one thing that is always brought up is money. We're not usually recruiting in the same league as the Cornells, PSUs, Okie States, Iowas, et al. Occasionally we are, but those times are quite rare. However, even your non-blue chip kids have been made to feel entitled to some sort of financial assistance from the athletics departments of the programs recruiting them.

 

More recently, with the advent of wrestling "schools" and high level clubs, parents want a return on the financial investment they've made to have their kid(s) make the podium in high school or to simply qualify. "But my son was a state qualifier!" Great, so were 671 other kids this year (in Illinois). Receiving a cold shoulder from parents is pretty common for us.

 

In terms of two year schools such as Triton, we find a lot of kids, their parents and in some cases their coaches, who think that the NJCAA is equivalent to JV2 wrestling at its worst. When we show them positive stats, it almost always reverts back to the "a four year school is where my son belongs" argument. Those are tough to win.

 

Along with that, and similar to the athletic scholarships, a lot of high school coaches are interested in building their own resumes by sending their guys to four year schools only. I don't know if this means job security or what, but we come across a lot of coaches whose guys should probably be in a community college setting for their academics, but coaches and parents are telling them that they're selling themselves and their careers short by doing so. We usually see those same guys at the semester with their lousy university grades in tow and knowing they blew their entire year of eligibility at one tournament where they went two-and-out.

 

After all of that, the next thing we find is what we like to call the "what have you done for me lately?" affect. It's natural for people to be drawn to and desire to be associated with winners. As someone said above, is the room competitive? Are you just recruiting good guys or developing them? For us, where do they end up after they graduate from Triton?

 

We find that a lot of recruits rarely want to talk about academics, but we always remind them that wrestling doesn't happen with out them being a full-time student. For some it's in one ear and out the other. For others it's taken to heart.

 

There's much more that goes into it from the kids' perspectives, and recruiting is a very tough battle for most schools, but the challenge of landing exceptional STUDENT-athletes is part of the fun.

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Parents do need to check their egos but I also found that D1 coaches need to as well. When my sons were doing the recruitment thing, some coaches thought they should go a long way from home and for no, or little money, just to wrestle for them and in a D1 program. When I made comments like, I do not really care if it is D1 or D3, they thought I was a complete idiot. I, and my sons, really did not care, as long as they were wrestling. We really felt like we were being sold a used car in the process.

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I have been involved with the recruiting process for a bunch of different sports at a bunch of different levels and I can tell you one thing is a constant: Ego.

 

The hardest part of the process is convincing a recruit (and their parents) that they are over reaching. I really think the issue is the new craze of National Signing Day press conferences. While most recruits won't sign there is a lot of pressure in your senior year as a high school student, when everyone is bragging about what school they will be attending, to tell people you are going somewhere great and doing great things too. There are way too many kids that want to say they are going somewhere that will impress people rather than kids who want to make the best long term decision based on their ability.

 

Kids need to go where they can see the lineup. There are very few kids out there that will pay their dues like Vollrath has and to his career is very impressive. Not only is he very talented but he has stayed committed to Penn State knowing that he could be a starter at most schools.

 

The common refrain, is that the kids will develop, and they likely will, but they will also face a new crop of recruits coming in the next year who will challenge them.

 

Most kids see a lot of schools as being interchangeable. And for the most part, they are right to think this, but picking a school as an athlete has a lot to do with the program and kids rarely look at it from the right perspective. You want to be at a school where you are getting to compete. And when they don't get to compete, a lot of kids get distracted and lose motivation.

 

I always tell kids to pick a school they like, where they will see playing time as a freshmen, and if they are an All-American or All-Conference as a freshmen and want a greater challenge they will have a great resume to open the transfer recruiting process. This rarely happens...

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Best one I ever heard about a parent.

 

Coach: We would like to offer your son half a scholarship.

 

Parent: Does this mean he only has to show up to practice half the time?

 

Needless to say, the athlete did not go to that school.

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I have been around the college athletics and the wrestling world for more years than I would like to say. One of my sons was a D1 recruit in baseball so I got to see how he was recruited which was average at best. This is probably going to get me in trouble but wrestling coaches may be the worst recruiters of any sport.

 

As for the junior college scene and their recruiting challenges it's really quite simple. Show the student/athlete your track record of placing kids at the D1 level and you will have few problems convincing kids to begin their career at your school.

 

With recruiting being the life blood of any college program, one person on the staff must be a great recruiter if the program is going to become a national contender. I have found that the best way to recruit is to be very organized, professional and be super honest with both the student/athlete and parents. The most difficult part of recruiting is the ability to evaluate talent. Gray Simons once said that he can teach a great athlete to wrestle but he can't make a great wrestler into an athlete. The day's of the marginal athlete out working their competition to become a national champion are just about over, you must be a very good athlete.

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