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These families have it all figured out!

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Just thinking about wrestling families who have used wrestling very well to help their kids obtain great educations. While full scholarships are hard to come by, wrestling is a sport that can help kids get into schools that they might otherwise not qualify for. I don't know anyone of these families personally but I do think their kids are headed in the right direction. Let me know of any others I may have missed.

 

Pepplemans: 2 at Harvard and 1 at Cornell

 

Rappos: I think 2 at Penn and I know a couple others have attended other good schools.

 

Betheas: 2 at Penn and 1 at George Mason?

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Just thinking about wrestling families who have used wrestling very well to help their kids obtain great educations. While full scholarships are hard to come by, wrestling is a sport that can help kids get into schools that they might otherwise not qualify for. I don't know anyone of these families personally but I do think their kids are headed in the right direction. Let me know of any others I may have missed.

 

Pepplemans: 2 at Harvard and 1 at Cornell

 

Rappos: I think 2 at Penn and I know a couple others have attended other good schools.

 

Betheas: 2 at Penn and 1 at George Mason?

 

This can actually be a pretty big disservice if the kid isn't adequately prepared for the school. I'm not saying this is the case for anyone listed above, but i've seen first hand how athletes will get into schools they shouldn't have, thinking merely getting in is the golden ticket, only to drop to the bottom of all their classes and really struggle throughout the four/five years. A lot of times, these kids are so far behind everyone else that nothing short of changing to a very easy major can keep them on track to graduate.

 

With that said, if the guy has the work ethic to catch up to the rest of the class, like you said, it really is a great decision to take advantage of the situation like this. Unfortunately, more often than not this isn't the case, as having a great work ethic on the mat vs in class are two very different beasts.

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The Dixons in Edmond, Oklahoma have done pretty well.

The three daughters have all attended or are attending college on athletic scholarships. The 3 boys Lance, Joel, and Andrew will be on partial scholarships at OU. Linda Dixon their mom played basketball at Wichita State.

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Just thinking about wrestling families who have used wrestling very well to help their kids obtain great educations. While full scholarships are hard to come by, wrestling is a sport that can help kids get into schools that they might otherwise not qualify for. I don't know anyone of these families personally but I do think their kids are headed in the right direction. Let me know of any others I may have missed.

 

Pepplemans: 2 at Harvard and 1 at Cornell

 

Rappos: I think 2 at Penn and I know a couple others have attended other good schools.

 

Betheas: 2 at Penn and 1 at George Mason?

 

This can actually be a pretty big disservice if the kid isn't adequately prepared for the school. I'm not saying this is the case for anyone listed above, but i've seen first hand how athletes will get into schools they shouldn't have, thinking merely getting in is the golden ticket, only to drop to the bottom of all their classes and really struggle throughout the four/five years. A lot of times, these kids are so far behind everyone else that nothing short of changing to a very easy major can keep them on track to graduate.

 

With that said, if the guy has the work ethic to catch up to the rest of the class, like you said, it really is a great decision to take advantage of the situation like this. Unfortunately, more often than not this isn't the case, as having a great work ethic on the mat vs in class are two very different beasts.

I can't think of ANY examples of this cautionary tale.

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my teammate in high school was trying to wrestle at duke, he had good grades, but not duke level. the coach said if he was a basketball player he would be in no problem, but because wrestling is not a main sport the school could not do anything for him.

 

when it comes to wrestlers, for the most part we have battled through scnerios that most people could not imagine and it builds character in us too work hard, and do well in school.

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my teammate in high school was trying to wrestle at duke, he had good grades, but not duke level. the coach said if he was a basketball player he would be in no problem, but because wrestling is not a main sport the school could not do anything for him.

 

when it comes to wrestlers, for the most part we have battled through scnerios that most people could not imagine and it builds character in us too work hard, and do well in school.

 

I hope this last sentence is a parody.

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Moita's

 

Father Jim wrestled at UC Berkeley

 

Vince is graduating from Brown this academic year (undersized 125 all 4 years), has already taken his LSAT and is applying to law schools. A CA HS State placer (jr year 3rd - lost in the semis to Alex Cisneros, R12 senior year) and 2 time Fargo AA (7th free, Jr Greco FInalist)

 

Joe is a sophomore at Columbia. 2 time CA State placer (soph year 4th - lost to Nahshon Garrett in the semis, R12 jr (Nikko Villareal in the medal match), 3rd as a sr - lost to State Champ Anthony Valencia in the semis). 2 time Fargo AA - 7th free, Jr Greco National Champ)

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I can't think of ANY examples of this cautionary tale.

 

That's because the situation I outlined isn't something that's really publicized and the kid is usually shuffled into a less challenging major. Most of the time, the kids themselves don't really care (if they cared, they would be working harder in school) and are just happy to get out with a big name degree and proud parents. The point I wanted to make, though, is that simply getting into these schools isn't necessarily beneficial for these families if the kids aren't applying themselves while there. I'm sure there are plenty of examples where this isn't the case and a guy is an exceptional student or can make up for an initial academic disadvantage with a good work ethic, but unfortunately this is usually not case.

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The Cornell ALS school is part of the NY State school system, meaning lower tuition for in-state residents, and supposedly somewhat lower admissions standards than the rest of the university, although you'll get just as good an education, and work just as hard.

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I can't think of ANY examples of this cautionary tale.

 

That's because the situation I outlined isn't something that's really publicized and the kid is usually shuffled into a less challenging major. Most of the time, the kids themselves don't really care (if they cared, they would be working harder in school) and are just happy to get out with a big name degree and proud parents. The point I wanted to make, though, is that simply getting into these schools isn't necessarily beneficial for these families if the kids aren't applying themselves while there. I'm sure there are plenty of examples where this isn't the case and a guy is an exceptional student or can make up for an initial academic disadvantage with a good work ethic, but unfortunately this is usually not case.

 

uh, so what? taking the degree from the IVY or equivalent caliber school and figuring the rest out later is still the best play here. its a shame that kids dont take full advantage of their opportunities in college but not that big of a shame.

 

side note, the wrestlers at the DIII schools like Hopkins or NYU getting degrees in tough majors are the nerds that really impress me.

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The Dixons in Edmond, Oklahoma have done pretty well.

The three daughters have all attended or are attending college on athletic scholarships. The 3 boys Lance, Joel, and Andrew will be on partial scholarships at OU. Linda Dixon their mom played basketball at Wichita State.

 

Is OU an academically prestigious university? I try to avoid the midwest.

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The Cornell ALS school is part of the NY State school system, meaning lower tuition for in-state residents, and supposedly somewhat lower admissions standards than the rest of the university, although you'll get just as good an education, and work just as hard.

 

I thought Lou Gehrig went to Columbia

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Start with a flawed premise - if an excellent wrestler can't survive his academic program then 1) maybe he shouldn't be in college to begin with and/or 2) maybe he hasn't learned the lessons that wrestling has to teach, e.g. discipline, tenacity, etc.

 

Only about 35% of the broader population have earned four year degrees - college isn't for everyone and "hiding" in college for four years just to wrestle is really myopic thinking. Schools are there for a purpose - and its not to goof around in the athletic program (unless one is talking about the bastardization that we call collegiate football and basketball). Wanna' wrestle after HS but don't want to go to school? Go to the OTC or go to a couple of open meets each year.

 

If a wrestler can't hack the school work then he isn't applying himself in the classroom like he is applying himself on the mats. Sports sponsored by the educational system are supposed to be teaching bigger lifetime skills; skills that can be applied to life; skills that will make a kid more successful after graduation. Wrestling is not an end unto itself - it's practice for life. A scholarship kid who isn't hitting the books hard while he has the opportunity has yet to learn the real lessons being taught.

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Just thinking about wrestling families who have used wrestling very well to help their kids obtain great educations. While full scholarships are hard to come by, wrestling is a sport that can help kids get into schools that they might otherwise not qualify for. I don't know anyone of these families personally but I do think their kids are headed in the right direction. Let me know of any others I may have missed.

 

Pepplemans: 2 at Harvard and 1 at Cornell

 

Rappos: I think 2 at Penn and I know a couple others have attended other good schools.

 

Betheas: 2 at Penn and 1 at George Mason?

 

This can actually be a pretty big disservice if the kid isn't adequately prepared for the school. I'm not saying this is the case for anyone listed above, but i've seen first hand how athletes will get into schools they shouldn't have, thinking merely getting in is the golden ticket, only to drop to the bottom of all their classes and really struggle throughout the four/five years. A lot of times, these kids are so far behind everyone else that nothing short of changing to a very easy major can keep them on track to graduate.

 

With that said, if the guy has the work ethic to catch up to the rest of the class, like you said, it really is a great decision to take advantage of the situation like this. Unfortunately, more often than not this isn't the case, as having a great work ethic on the mat vs in class are two very different beasts.

You do understand how the public refers to an athlete that struggles to get into a major academic school, struggles to graduate from that school, continues to struggle in medical/dental school and finishes dead last in their class? The last time I noticed people called them a doctor. It's often called survive and advance.

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You do understand how the public refers to an athlete that struggles to get into a major academic school, struggles to graduate from that school, continues to struggle in medical/dental school and finishes dead last in their class? The last time I noticed people called them a doctor. It's often called survive and advance.

 

Or possibly the garbage collector - a degree and a job are not one in the same. A lot of kids in college think that the race is done when they are handed their diploma when in point of fact, it is just the start of the race.

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npope, you're wrong.

 

A few things for you to consider:

 

The elite academic schools are a lot harder to get into than they are to graduate from. Unless you're a perpetual truant or were stupid enough to sign up for a hard-core engineering or hard science major without the quantitative aptitude to pass classes (and at the elite schools, that means acing high school math and science with math SAT 700+ minimum... otherwise, consider sociology, philosophy, etc.), you are going to get a degree the vast majority of the time, i.e. 90%+ of the time.

 

If you are good enough at wrestling to get into an elite school in spite of your above average but not elite grades, then you are more than likely going to at least letter if not start at some point. You might even do well as a starter. If your coach likes you, that is enough to get you into the [insert elite school here] wrestling family.

 

cbg is right: If you graduate as a dumb jock from an academically elite school, guess what, you are still a grad from that elite school.

 

Moreover, if the elite school values wrestling enough to let wrestlers in who may not have gotten in on academic merit alone, chances are the alumni from said school are going to help any wrestler that graduates, which, as I've established, is the vast majority of them, when they decide to hang up their shoes and join the workforce.

 

If you're a "dumb" jock, you won't be getting any calls from Oxford to join their Rhodes scholarship program. But if you are a nice enough guy with serviceable enough presentation skills, i.e. you do not bomb interviews, your chances of landing a good job having graduated from an elite school whose alumni values your wrestling background is probably an order of magnitude higher than if you had gone to an average school.

 

By good job, I don't necessarily mean joining the analyst program at Goldman Sachs, getting an offer from McKinsey, joining the medical research team at the Mayo Clinic, getting to choose between Google, Apple, Facebook, etc. I mean "good enough" job, significantly above average starting wage, clear career path without any ceilings, desirable industry, etc.

 

In other words, on average, using wrestling to get into an elite school is as good a financial payoff as you can get in our sport with the possible exception of winning the Olympics. I suppose taking your chances and going the entrepreneurial route (starting a popular wrestling club/clinic, etc.) could pay off bigger, but again, I said "on average."

 

Individuals may choose different schools for different reasons, and that's fine and sometimes it works out well, but again, on average, you will do best by going to the best school (or one among a group of "best schools", give or take) you can wrestle your way into, even if you might be a laggard in class. Parents, take note!

 

Once you are employed, however, the value of your degree plummets like a rock in water and it's all about delivering for your boss. Elite degrees open doors and connections, but they don't do your work. No matter how many Harvard degrees you have, if you don't deliver, you're going to get canned. But your chances of being in the position to get canned from a good job in the first place shoot up astronomically if you are a "dumb" jock with a degree from Harvard, Princeton, Stanford, Columbia, Cornell, Penn, Brown, Northwestern, Duke, etc.

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side note, the wrestlers at the DIII schools like Hopkins or NYU getting degrees in tough majors are the nerds that really impress me.

 

Agree! There are a lot of very challenging wrestling programs like Chicago and Williams that have very good students and they aren't looking to look the other way at admissions to get a high caliber athlete.

 

In Division-I we have Franklin & Marshall and Davidson that both are as elite as any undergraduate schools. Wrestlers at these two programs really amaze me. They are in a very academically challenging school, a small staff, no scholarships, and they are asked to compete against the best in the country. These guys really impress me and I have all the confidence in the world they will do well after school.

 

Any engineering student impresses me too. And we have wrestlers in Engineering programs at some of the top schools in the country like Lehigh and Michigan.

 

There are a lot impressive people in wrestling, but often, I think, we do a disservice by only recognizing accomplishments on the mats. The only time many people care is years later when they are asking these successful individuals for donations.

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What is special about the college of agriculture and life sciences at Cornell? Almost every cornell wrestler is enrolled in that particular college. That seems odd.

 

One of the neat things about Cornell is it truly is a UNIVERSITY, and kids there, including wrestlers, study all sorts of wonderful things. Eddie Lu is a great example; Eddie wrestled at Cornell (in the 80's I think), went on to get a PhD at Stanford, became an astronaut for NASA, and is now is tracking asteroids that could potentially threaten the earth. Eddie Lu, saving the world! Great to see how people can apply thier education!

 

Here's a neat article about Ed:

http://www.stanforddaily.com/2013/03/08 ... asteroids/

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npope, you're wrong.

 

While some of your premise is true, e.g. graduates of elite schools might get a free look on the first round but after that it's what you do for your employer. That said, you are talking only about the very elite institutions. More generally, mediocrity is rewarded with mediocrity.

 

Excellence counts. Just like merely showing up in the wrestling room and going through the motions doesn't get you a spot on the team - much less wins on the mat. Excellence is rewarded; mediocrity is isn't - that a paradigm of life, son. Sure there are some exceptions, but they are just that - exceptions - not the rule. Want a mediocre job? Be mediocre in you preparation for that job.

 

As a professor, I constantly see this paradigm in play. Kids thinking that all they have to o is to graduate and then suddenly all their dreams are fulfilled. Simply not true.

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I agree about those small school wrestlers in tough majors. Very impressive. But it isn't just the small schools.

 

I know this situation exists at a LOT of schools. Just at Penn State we have multiple time academic all americans, like David Taylor, Nico Megaludis (Finance), and Matt Brown (Crime Law and Justice). Zain Retherford a a 4.0 kid in high school and is headed down this same road in a business major. Matt McCutcheon was a high school class president four years in a row. So these are not only big school wrestlers, but they are also the starters and soon to be starting wrestlers at Penn State.

 

I'd like to hear about the top kids who are also great students at other schools. Nice thread to focus on the positive.

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npope, you're wrong.

 

Nope, sorry - you are wrong.

 

You're in my world on this one. I'm a professor and I am in the business of prepping kids to get jobs. I can say with certainty that merely graduating is a recipe for nothing except maybe getting a job flipping burgers. Excellence counts. Just like merely showing up in the wrestling room and going through the motions doesn't get you a spot on the team - much less wins on the mat. Excellence is rewarded; mediocrity is isn't - that a paradigm of life, son. Sure there are some exceptions, but they are just that - exceptions - not the rule. Want a mediocre job? Be mediocre in you preparation for that job.

 

You're a professor and it's your world? I've hired more than 300 kids throughout my career. How many have you hired? You're dead wrong.

 

Getting the best possible degree you can get by using your wrestling is one of the few financial benefits in our sport, a sport that very rarely pays otherwise.

 

Yes, excellence counts. But getting into an elite school is excellence in and of itself. And that counts too.

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