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Russain Training Video

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It's the Dagestani Team preparing for the Yarygin Tournament. That's what the title says.

 

Only people I can make out are Sajidov, Gadisov, Goygereev & Arsen Gitinov. They interview the coach (Sajidov), the team trainer & the Director. They go on to talk about things like Lada cars, ushanka hats, Rocky Balboa, Glanost, and something about Ronald Reagan. I found that to be very strange.

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Yes good catch! I didn't even notice that.

 

And that move at 11:45 is incredible. And that is why the Russians will always beat us. Innovative stuff like that.

 

what, you've never seen anyone helicopter over the other guy's back to set up a single?

 

i think the live goes while hopping on one foot gives these guys the athleticism to do such things.

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The wrestling room and practice look strikingly similar to any in Baku, Mahachkala, Yerevan or even Tbilisi as far back as the 70s or 80s. Missing along the row of benches, though, are the large felt tongs one was required to don over your shoes as you entered the wrestling facility in Tbilisi. One wouldn't dare smudge the constantly polished floors of the hallowed wrestling practice venue--despite toilet facilities that reeked.

 

I knew wrestling had to be popular in Tbilisi when the workman nailed the wrestling mat cover to the 10,000 seat venue hardwood floor. Evident--only in hindsight--was the deep seated disdain some harbored for their countrymen--among the Caucasus Republics. Each entered its own team along w/ the Soviet national team.

I recall when Yumin [4x World Champ and '76 Olym Champ] from Mahachkala lost in an early rd of Tbilisi [rd robin format] to a wrestler from the ARM team. As the 2 warmed-up for the next rd, Yumin strolled over to him and foot-swept him to his back on the bare gym floor. As the USA National coach @ the time, I found the interchange amusing, but gave it little thought until the USSR was dismantled and the deep seated resentment manifested itself in a few military skirmishes--AZE vs ARM; Chechnya vs RUS, RUS vs GEO!

@ the banquet following the competition, Yuri Shakmuradov the then-Soviet Freestyle coach noted: "I know the USA has its problems as its 2 wrestling organizations battle for control, but we also have our problems. Look at this tournament; 4 of my 6 World Champions were beaten by one of their countrymen." I politely interrupted him and said: "Yuri I wish I had such a problem."

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Interesting post Stan.

 

Reminds me of the article someone posted on the Satiev brothers and their intense political differences. Just fascinating.

 

Seriously, I'm getting quite an education on history, geography, cultures, etc. the more I follow international wrestling.

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for anyone interested in learning more about the history of the people Caucasus Mountains, may i recommend a book?

 

http://www.amazon.com/Let-Our-Fame-Be-Great/dp/0465029043

 

Let Our Fame Be Great by Oliver Bullough. Still working my way through it Kindle but its incredibly well written and eminently fascinating. its especially relevant with the winter olympics coming to Sochi and the protests from the Circassian diaspora. several different peoples and time periods are examined in depth while the author tours the present day lands. As one of the last places colonized by the Russian Empire, the various groups of "Mountain Turks" have a very complex and often troubling history of national and ethnic identity.

 

 

anyway, solid book and makes following myriad "Russian" wrestlers in international competitions even more interesting IMO.

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If you're interested in wrestling books from the region try to find, Our Ali, written by Yuri Shakhmuradov [Russian, left side of page & English, right side] about the "father of Dagestan wrestling" Ali Aliev.

Aliev, often noted for his cross-ankle turn, was a 5x World Champion in the '60s--though never an Olympic Medalist. Interestingly, he & Gray Simmons wrestled to a tie in '64 and Don Behm bested him in '68. Here is the iban # ISBN 978-5-98930-025-7.

Yuri Shakhmuradov is from Dagestan and was a World Champion ['70 or '71], then the USSR's freestyle coach the next yr. thru the end of the decade when Yarygin took over. Most recently, he's returned as RUS women's coach. [perhaps why the Russian women were so improved in London].

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Great Tblili story Stan! Funny thing is, the Soviet block wrestlers obviously have great pride in their abilities and hate to lose, but it's common for them to show up to lesser competitions with some very questionable fitness and preparation. Is this a deliberate choice in that part of the world to save wear and tear and peak for the big ones? Or are some of the wrestlers just lazy?

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armspin wrote,

Is this a deliberate choice in that part of the world to save wear and tear and peak for the big ones? Or are some of the wrestlers just lazy

 

Interestingly, when this topic arose in our discussions, the National Coaches admitted there was a difference. Yet they emphasized: "When conditioning becomes the deciding factor Stan, you can be certain, we will be better conditioned." They argued the difference in technical proficiency used less energy and provided the appearance of being stronger than they were--so the time spent in becoming technically more proficient was time well spent and superior to let's say, running stadium steps w/ some one on your back.

This of course was good to know. I realized my task [not easy I would add]: Make the USA team technically, tactically & strategically sufficient so that conditioning was the deciding factor before they could adjust.

The other factor to consider is the length of time the Russians wrestle. Before Lee Kemp, the USA wrestlers won their Gold medals and retired in order to make-a-living. There was no training center nor renumeration for winning, just satisfaction. The Russians, on the otherhand, knew they were in for the long haul and it was a means of surviving--relatively speaking, quite well. Take for instance Sergei Beleglazov and John Smith. John won 6 Gold medals by the time he was 26. Sergei won 8 Gold medals, but between 25 & 33 yr's of age. The Russian may pace a bit for longevity.

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gimpeltf wrote,

And, as I recall, Sergei was playing soccer up until around 11-12 years old.

 

Not sure if it matters. I didn't know the sport of wrestling existed until I was a freshman in high school; and, other than a few local matches, only started wrestling freestyle after my collegiate career ended. As most in the Soviet system, Sergei most likely didn't enter competitive situations until 16-18 years old or even later. They believe [rightly, if the object is solely to develop the best for the World & Olympic Championships] the developmental yrs are better dedicated to perfecting technical skills; not losing weight or other distractions associated w/ competing. Since they're in it for the long haul, they have plenty of time for competition later.

 

In the USA the vast majority of our young wrestlers will never even contemplate wrestling after high school, let alone after college. Nonetheless, for them, the competitive situation--including the weight reduction--teaches valuable lessons and often plays a vital role in their personal and character development. I don't believe we should or will ever sacrifice this component of U.S. wrestling for the benefit of the development of a few.

 

Plus I don't believe we need to change, other than a few minor adjustments that in my opinion would both improve our folkstyle and @ the same time make the transition to freestyle easier. Our wrestling community is fairly inventive when left to its own devices. Unfortunately, a granby-roll doesn't work well in intern'l. wrestling. A switch and cross-arm role, however, are surprisingly easy to execute intern'lly.

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What I was suggesting was that they didn't start doing certain sports for a while and worked on developing motor skills and letting their people figure out which sport was the best for you by watching what you showed them in something like soccer. Another quote I remember from him (and not sure if he meant it) was that they would put the kids on the high dive. If they would jump off on their own, they'd make them wrestlers.

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Perhaps there was a touch of tongue-in-cheek in Sergei's diving example; but wrestling competitively @ an early age is generally frowned upon by Sergei and the Russian's in general. The risk of burning out talented wrestlers outweighs any benefit from the experience.

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for anyone interested in learning more about the history of the people Caucasus Mountains, may i recommend a book?

 

http://www.amazon.com/Let-Our-Fame-Be-Great/dp/0465029043

 

Let Our Fame Be Great by Oliver Bullough. Still working my way through it Kindle but its incredibly well written and eminently fascinating. its especially relevant with the winter olympics coming to Sochi and the protests from the Circassian diaspora. several different peoples and time periods are examined in depth while the author tours the present day lands. As one of the last places colonized by the Russian Empire, the various groups of "Mountain Turks" have a very complex and often troubling history of national and ethnic identity.

 

 

anyway, solid book and makes following myriad "Russian" wrestlers in international competitions even more interesting IMO.

 

Jaroslav, just got the book today. Hey, are there Cliff Notes for this thing? Just kidding, although it is almost 500 pages with no pictures (just a few maps).

 

Thanks for the recommendation.

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I am also going to get a copy. Two more items that may be of interest:

 

First, Mikhail Lermontov's novel A Hero of Our Time is a classic set in Ossetia and dating from 1840 which is worth a read.

 

Second, here is a photographic collection dating from just over a century ago. What makes these remarkable is that they are in color and look like they were taken yesterday. Images are from south and central pre-revolution Russia. http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2010/0 ... y_ago.html

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I am also going to get a copy. Two more items that may be of interest:

 

First, Mikhail Lermontov's novel A Hero of Our Time is a classic set in Ossetia and dating from 1840 which is worth a read.

 

Second, here is a photographic collection dating from just over a century ago. What makes these remarkable is that they are in color and look like they were taken yesterday. Images are from south and central pre-revolution Russia. http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2010/0 ... y_ago.html

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That move at 11:46 was sick! I have seen these typical drill videos before. I am interested in the technique development part of the training. I am curious how they teach technique to a group and to individuals for their specific needs.

 

Fila posted this on facebook. Pretty cool stuff. Anyone care to provide some context and translation? Pretty sure the coach is Sajid Sajidov but after that I'm lost

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That move at 11:46 was sick! I have seen these typical drill videos before. I am interested in the technique development part of the training. I am curious how they teach technique to a group and to individuals for their specific needs.

 

Fila posted this on facebook. Pretty cool stuff. Anyone care to provide some context and translation? Pretty sure the coach is Sajid Sajidov but after that I'm lost

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That move at 11:46 was sick! I have seen these typical drill videos before. I am interested in the technique development part of the training. I am curious how they teach technique to a group and to individuals for their specific needs.

 

Fila posted this on facebook. Pretty cool stuff. Anyone care to provide some context and translation? Pretty sure the coach is Sajid Sajidov but after that I'm lost

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