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potdangerous

The James English Story

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You are welcome.

 

James never won a PIAA state title. He came on with Sunderland, was never quite healthy, and the brief periods where he was he had a stud in front of him (Molinaro, Alton). If I were him I would have transferred or given up on my dream. He finally earned his one chance at the postseason this year and showed us all that wrestling, above all else, rewards heart and grit.

 

I'm a pretty stoic guy, but this story warms my heart.

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Good stuff.

 

Those of us who follow PSU closely have known about James for years. Really glad that the rest of the country got a chance to see how hard this kid has worked to fulfill a dream. He truly personifies the grit, the determination and the huge heart it takes to be a wrestler.

 

Glad you got your chance to shine James. And thanks for a great ending.

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Good stuff.

 

Those of us who follow PSU closely have known about James for years. Really glad that the rest of the country got a chance to see how hard this kid has worked to fulfill a dream. He truly personifies the grit, the determination and the huge heart it takes to be a wrestler.

 

Glad you got your chance to shine James. And thanks for a great ending.

Didn't win a state title, but entered the 2008 AAA tourney undefeated in what may have been one of the most sick brackets in PIAA history...

 

* Lost to James Fleming (2x AA) 1-0 in the QF and placed 3rd. Walter Peppelman (2x AA), a returning champ, then beat English in the SF, and Joey Napoli beat Peppelman in the Final. Fleming, who also entered the tourney undefeated, ended up 5th.

 

*After losing to Fleming, English beat PSU teammate, James Vollrath in the R12, 3-2 UTB.

 

* English then beat Eric Burgey (2x Div II champ, 1x NAIA champ) in the consolation QFs, 3-2 UTB. Burgey placed 7th.

 

English wrestled out of the SC Region, which included past/future state champs Peppelman and Napoli.

 

English's other placings:

2007: 7th at 145 (future NCAA champ Steve Bosak - runnerup, Nick Nelson - champ , Jake Kemerer - 6th, Justin Accordino, and Donnie Tasser - 5th were in the bracket.)

 

2006: DNP - lost to Fleming in the R12, 4-2. Bracket included future AAs Zack Kemmerer, Matt Moley and Fleming.

 

http://www.piaa.org/assets/web/document ... A_Brax.pdf

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English definitely wasn't satisfied with not reaching his personal college goals in wrestling and made sure he took every opportunity he could to try and accomplish something before the left college. His body may not have always liked it, his coaches may not have thought it was realistic, but you have to like his guts and determination to achieve something like this. English may be the guy you use as the poster child for why Penn State's squeaked out a National Title this season.

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That was a good thing Cael did talking about English. Especially in his admitting he had written him off due to injuries and such. Very inspirational and at great example for kids to see that all that matters is if you believe in yourself.

 

Congrats to James English

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He is the exact reason why you shouldnt listen to people when they tell you "its time to hang it up." People who want to blame genetics as a reason to quit should really take a look at this guy and re-evaluate their belief system. It takes some guys longer to get ove the hump than others, but most will just quit before hand and chalk it up to something different. Its very motivational when a dude like this tells his detractors to stuff it, takes accountibility in himself cost be damned, and goes out and places at NCAA's.

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He is the exact reason why you shouldnt listen to people when they tell you "its time to hang it up." People who want to blame genetics as a reason to quit should really take a look at this guy and re-evaluate their belief system. It takes some guys longer to get ove the hump than others, but most will just quit before hand and chalk it up to something different. Its very motivational when a dude like this tells his detractors to stuff it, takes accountibility in himself cost be damned, and goes out and places at NCAA's.

 

Olddirty, interesting comment. English's points did help the team secure the title, and that was a good thing. But in fairness, you could look at this from another angle. English made it very clear that his goal was to win an NCAA title, and of course he failed to achieve that goal. If his detractors were saying that he couldn't win an ncaa title, they would be correct.

 

I don't take anything away from this kid at all, but I'm not sure what the story is here. Yes, he helped PSU, but he failed to reach his own goals. He was crushed after he lost in the championship bracket. Then he lost again after that. He achieved what some consider to be a great accomplishment, AA honors at the NCAA Division 1 tournament, but that wasn't what he came to the tournament to do. This isn't very motivational to me. I find a story like Cael's quest to win 4 ncaa titles and Olympic gold to be more motivational. Just my opinion.

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He is the exact reason why you shouldnt listen to people when they tell you "its time to hang it up." People who want to blame genetics as a reason to quit should really take a look at this guy and re-evaluate their belief system. It takes some guys longer to get ove the hump than others, but most will just quit before hand and chalk it up to something different. Its very motivational when a dude like this tells his detractors to stuff it, takes accountibility in himself cost be damned, and goes out and places at NCAA's.

 

Olddirty, interesting comment. English's points did help the team secure the title, and that was a good thing. But in fairness, you could look at this from another angle. English made it very clear that his goal was to win an NCAA title, and of course he failed to achieve that goal. If his detractors were saying that he couldn't win an ncaa title, they would be correct.

 

I don't take anything away from this kid at all, but I'm not sure what the story is here. Yes, he helped PSU, but he failed to reach his own goals. He was crushed after he lost in the championship bracket. Then he lost again after that. He achieved what some consider to be a great accomplishment, AA honors at the NCAA Division 1 tournament, but that wasn't what he came to the tournament to do. This isn't very motivational to me. I find a story like Cael's quest to win 4 ncaa titles and Olympic gold to be more motivational. Just my opinion.

 

I followed several of your comments on different threads today and I hope your just having a bad day and running around trying to contradict everything instead of adding anything productive to the threads. Or may you're just an unhappy person releasing his frustrations on everyone else.

 

Anyways, since "your not sure what the story is here" you may have taken some blows to the head.

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Olddirty, interesting comment. English's points did help the team secure the title, and that was a good thing. But in fairness, you could look at this from another angle. English made it very clear that his goal was to win an NCAA title, and of course he failed to achieve that goal. If his detractors were saying that he couldn't win an ncaa title, they would be correct.

 

I don't take anything away from this kid at all, but I'm not sure what the story is here. Yes, he helped PSU, but he failed to reach his own goals. He was crushed after he lost in the championship bracket. Then he lost again after that. He achieved what some consider to be a great accomplishment, AA honors at the NCAA Division 1 tournament, but that wasn't what he came to the tournament to do. This isn't very motivational to me. I find a story like Cael's quest to win 4 ncaa titles and Olympic gold to be more motivational. Just my opinion.

 

I struggle with this dilemma. We teach kids to set their sights on being the champion -- and to settle for nothing less. They grow up with that dream, and work hard as if no other result would be acceptable. Our hope is that motivation will draw the best out of them.

 

Yet in any bracket, only one person can be a champion. What's the lesson here? Is it about the journey or the goal? Or is "the value of the journey" something losers say to console themselves? At what point can a man stand back and reflect on his wrestling career and be satisfied that he did right by himself?

 

Cael is an enormous inspiration, and we celebrate our winners. But it seems that we should also celebrate struggle and hard work for its own sake. Maybe we can only do that in retrospect, when we have given it everything we've got and lost. I honestly don't think that losing makes the story any less inspirational. At least I hope it doesn't.

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He is the exact reason why you shouldnt listen to people when they tell you "its time to hang it up." People who want to blame genetics as a reason to quit should really take a look at this guy and re-evaluate their belief system. It takes some guys longer to get ove the hump than others, but most will just quit before hand and chalk it up to something different. Its very motivational when a dude like this tells his detractors to stuff it, takes accountibility in himself cost be damned, and goes out and places at NCAA's.

 

Olddirty, interesting comment. English's points did help the team secure the title, and that was a good thing. But in fairness, you could look at this from another angle. English made it very clear that his goal was to win an NCAA title, and of course he failed to achieve that goal. If his detractors were saying that he couldn't win an ncaa title, they would be correct.

 

I don't take anything away from this kid at all, but I'm not sure what the story is here. Yes, he helped PSU, but he failed to reach his own goals. He was crushed after he lost in the championship bracket. Then he lost again after that. He achieved what some consider to be a great accomplishment, AA honors at the NCAA Division 1 tournament, but that wasn't what he came to the tournament to do. This isn't very motivational to me. I find a story like Cael's quest to win 4 ncaa titles and Olympic gold to be more motivational. Just my opinion.

 

I followed several of your comments on different threads today and I hope your just having a bad day and running around trying to contradict everything instead of adding anything productive to the threads. Or may you're just an unhappy person releasing his frustrations on everyone else.

 

Anyways, since "your not sure what the story is here" you may have taken some blows to the head.

 

What is it about my posts that makes you view me this way? I hope you aren't letting a few other posters comments influence your opinion.

 

What's wrong with my last post? I'd like to hear the issue that you have with it.

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Olddirty, interesting comment. English's points did help the team secure the title, and that was a good thing. But in fairness, you could look at this from another angle. English made it very clear that his goal was to win an NCAA title, and of course he failed to achieve that goal. If his detractors were saying that he couldn't win an ncaa title, they would be correct.

 

I don't take anything away from this kid at all, but I'm not sure what the story is here. Yes, he helped PSU, but he failed to reach his own goals. He was crushed after he lost in the championship bracket. Then he lost again after that. He achieved what some consider to be a great accomplishment, AA honors at the NCAA Division 1 tournament, but that wasn't what he came to the tournament to do. This isn't very motivational to me. I find a story like Cael's quest to win 4 ncaa titles and Olympic gold to be more motivational. Just my opinion.

 

I struggle with this dilemma. We teach kids to set their sights on being the champion -- and to settle for nothing less. They grow up with that dream, and work hard as if no other result would be acceptable. Our hope is that motivation will draw the best out of them.

 

Yet in any bracket, only one person can be a champion. What's the lesson here? Is it about the journey or the goal? Or is "the value of the journey" something losers say to console themselves? At what point can a man stand back and reflect on his wrestling career and be satisfied that he did right by himself?

 

Cael is an enormous inspiration, and we celebrate our winners. But it seems that we should also celebrate struggle and hard work for its own sake. Maybe we can only do that in retrospect, when we have given it everything we've got and lost. I honestly don't think that losing makes the story any less inspirational. At least I hope it doesn't.

 

Good post knox. There just may be a certain sense where losing doesn't make the story less inspirational, but I know there is definitely a sense (to me) where losing absolutely does make it less inspirational. I don't think that I could show this story to a talented up and coming wrestler who shows promise. This story certainly couldn't be at the top of the list. Jmo.

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He is the exact reason why you shouldnt listen to people when they tell you "its time to hang it up." People who want to blame genetics as a reason to quit should really take a look at this guy and re-evaluate their belief system. It takes some guys longer to get ove the hump than others, but most will just quit before hand and chalk it up to something different. Its very motivational when a dude like this tells his detractors to stuff it, takes accountibility in himself cost be damned, and goes out and places at NCAA's.

 

Olddirty, interesting comment. English's points did help the team secure the title, and that was a good thing. But in fairness, you could look at this from another angle. English made it very clear that his goal was to win an NCAA title, and of course he failed to achieve that goal. If his detractors were saying that he couldn't win an ncaa title, they would be correct.

 

I don't take anything away from this kid at all, but I'm not sure what the story is here. Yes, he helped PSU, but he failed to reach his own goals. He was crushed after he lost in the championship bracket. Then he lost again after that. He achieved what some consider to be a great accomplishment, AA honors at the NCAA Division 1 tournament, but that wasn't what he came to the tournament to do. This isn't very motivational to me. I find a story like Cael's quest to win 4 ncaa titles and Olympic gold to be more motivational. Just my opinion.

 

Mike Evans is not impressed with James English.

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He is the exact reason why you shouldnt listen to people when they tell you "its time to hang it up." People who want to blame genetics as a reason to quit should really take a look at this guy and re-evaluate their belief system. It takes some guys longer to get ove the hump than others, but most will just quit before hand and chalk it up to something different. Its very motivational when a dude like this tells his detractors to stuff it, takes accountibility in himself cost be damned, and goes out and places at NCAA's.

 

Sometimes it's very important to listen to people when they tell you to quit. It's great to see a guy like English battle through and make a nice run at nationals, but I would never question guys like Deitchler who make important health decisions ahead of pursuit of their athletic goals. There are also other examples where people fizzle out and hang it up, but it's college, and people find new interests, reestablish their priorities, and start looking at their life after wrestling...Especially when you're on the outside looking in at the starting lineup of a d1 program with no scholarship.

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Good post knox. There just may be a certain sense where losing doesn't make the story less inspirational, but I know there is definitely a sense (to me) where losing absolutely does make it less inspirational. I don't think that I could show this story to a talented up and coming wrestler who shows promise. This story certainly couldn't be at the top of the list. Jmo.

 

I agree, this is not the first story you teach a promising young wrestler. Perhaps it is still one you use as a life lesson about building character and believing in yourself. I don't know the achievements of most people in the forum, but I am sure most of us didn't earn a national title though most of us dreamt of it. This story is about how you react when you fall short. Even when he lost the championship he fought his way to 7th place. He can look back and genuinely have pride in that.

 

He is an AA when he shouldn't have been wrestling at all. To the many young wrestlers out there, they won't even get to that level. How do you teach kids to achieve great things even if the national title is out of reach?

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I don't take anything away from this kid at all, but I'm not sure what the story is here. Yes, he helped PSU, but he failed to reach his own goals. He was crushed after he lost in the championship bracket. Then he lost again after that. He achieved what some consider to be a great accomplishment, AA honors at the NCAA Division 1 tournament, but that wasn't what he came to the tournament to do. This isn't very motivational to me. I find a story like Cael's quest to win 4 ncaa titles and Olympic gold to be more motivational. Just my opinion.

 

People get very motivated by seeing someone in their position do something that they often think is impossible. Who do you think the average DI wrestler is closer to: James English or Cael Sanderson?

 

Maybe you are in the same position as Cael, I dont know, but many others are not. For many, inspiration comes from those who struggle and overcome much more than those who are seemingly invincible and literally never lose.

 

The line of thinking of "anything less of first is a failure" is often times the one adopted by those who never even accomplished anything. I would take that line of thought seriously by anyone who places higher than English did or accomplishes something better at the elite level. However, most people who have that kind of success will usually boost up others who find success, not tear them down. I can guarantee you the likes of Ruth and Taylor do not view English as an uninspiring loser who showed up to NCAA's and blew it.

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