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LordNelson

How to beat Delgado

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As for variations to the double, if Garrett wants to try something different, he might want to look at how Logan stieber hits and finishes his doubles. It's unorthodox. He usually snakes an arm against the near leg, cups his hand against the foot or ankle of the opposite leg, and finishes the double to the "wrong" side, almost like a cutback motion. Very difficult to funk that.

 

video?

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As for variations to the double, if Garrett wants to try something different, he might want to look at how Logan stieber hits and finishes his doubles. It's unorthodox. He usually snakes an arm against the near leg, cups his hand against the foot or ankle of the opposite leg, and finishes the double to the "wrong" side, almost like a cutback motion. Very difficult to funk that.

 

WN: you beat me to it. Stieber has a multitude of shots he uses and the one you're describing works great against funk. Stieber almost spins you down like a corkscrew.

 

Actually, I think Logan shoots this technique out of a single leg.

Both Logan and Hunter will take their single shot to their lead leg side.

Traditional defense to that shot is a guy sprawling that leg and hip down hard.

What that does is takes pressure off of the defender's far hip and the Stieber's will then duck their heads to the outside and corkscrew a finish to both legs.

 

If the guy reacts with really good hips or they actually get to the corner they just finish the traditional sweep single. Because Logan and Hunter are so freakin' strong they will shoot straight in on purpose to get it.

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As for variations to the double, if Garrett wants to try something different, he might want to look at how Logan stieber hits and finishes his doubles. It's unorthodox. He usually snakes an arm against the near leg, cups his hand against the foot or ankle of the opposite leg, and finishes the double to the "wrong" side, almost like a cutback motion. Very difficult to funk that.

 

WN: you beat me to it. Stieber has a multitude of shots he uses and the one you're describing works great against funk. Stieber almost spins you down like a corkscrew.

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It looks like a single but it's usually a double, which he sometimes changes off to a single if he can't get a grip on the far leg or if the guy squares his hips successfully and he needs to post with the other arm to keep his position.

 

I've literally studied this move for hours at a time because I like it so much. I've seen him hit it on Russians successfully. It is a very high percentage move when he gets anything close to a decent grip and it allows for a full recovery the majority of the time if he misses somehow (e.g. against Retherford when he shot but missed).

 

Logan also has a very good single with multiple finishes, one of which is to hit a barzagar or cut back into a double. But in this case, I'm talking about his double. Silver-medal obviously knows what I'm talking about.

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Two time National Champ and going for a third. Does he care if some anonymous posters on an internet forum like him, not a chance. He laughs at all of you.

 

He will go down as one of the great lightweights; and one of the quickest this side of John Smith.

Interesting question just popped into my head. When it's all said and done, who gets remembered as greater: Delgado or McD. Probably Delgado if he wins again next year, but what if Mega or Garrett knock him off?

Definitely Delgado if he wins it again next year. And arguably Delgado even if he finishes 2nd or 3rd.

In that case, they'd both be 2x champs. However, Delgado would be a 4x AA to McDonough's 3 times. And, probably more importantly, Delgado won 3 out of 5 of their head-to-head matches in college.

 

Head-to-Head Results (First 3 meetings in 2011-12, last 2 in 2012-13)

1st meeting: Delgado Dec McDonough 11-7SV

2nd meeting: McDonough Dec Delgado 6-3

3rd meeting: McDonough Dec Jesse Delgado 4-3

4th meeting: Delgado Dec McDonough (Iowa) 9-4

5th meeting: Delgado Dec McDonough 10-4

 

NCAA Finishes:

Delgado: 7,1,1,?

McDonough: 1,2,1, DNP

.

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Alright then. If Delgado shot and scored, what's the big deal?

 

People give Delgado crap for "not being offensive," or "stalling" or whatever they call his motion, but he shoots and scores off of it. Less can be said for the Hawkeyes and Cowboys who had something like 7 combined takedowns in their dual meet.

 

Also, for the record, defending is not stalling on your feet. Backing up and refusing to engage is stalling. Delgado stayed in the circle and defended himself. Not stalling.

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People love to hate on Delgado's style not so much because of stalling, but because his style challenges most folks sensibilities of what wrestling is about. Unless you are a Delgado fan or an Illinois fan, or a fan of wrestlers who live incredibly dangerously and get away with it, the average fan doesn't like to see one guy repeatedly get 99 percent of a takedown but get zero points for it because the defensive wrestler pulls something out of his ass. If Delgado always scored a takedown of his own in these exchanges, I think more people would like his wrestling. But when leg passes turn into stalemates over and over again, like in the Garrett match, it gets frustrating. It just seems like it shouldn't work, which is why it bothers people. But really, Delgado is doing nothing wrong, and it's Garrett that needs to make the adjustments. Delgado is begging to be taken down, but so far the necessary adjustments have not been made. I do think that the first non-takedown that was video reviewed was a takedown. It happened very fast, but after Delgado tried a leg pass his first roll through was countered and Garrett was behind him and on the side, in a position that I thought constituted control. Delgado had a weak grasp of the leg, but this should have been a TD. Only after Delgado scrambled further was control lost. Control was very brief, but it was there.

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I do think that the first non-takedown that was video reviewed was a takedown. It happened very fast, but after Delgado tried a leg pass his first roll through was countered and Garrett was behind him and on the side, in a position that I thought constituted control. Delgado had a weak grasp of the leg, but this should have been a TD. Only after Delgado scrambled further was control lost. Control was very brief, but it was there.

 

Coach Smith said in a Flowrestling interview that the exact situation Delgado put himself in should be considered a takedown and back points, and I agree as well. However, for the time being, Delgado on his feet expertly controls the circle, score offensively, scores on reshots, and can stop almost anyone's shot. If next year we end up with rule changes (like this years "Oliver takedown" rule) that limit Delgado's ability to force a stalemate, he'll be in trouble.

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I don't think too many people are hating on Delgado due to the results of the Garrett match. Frustrating to watch, as dsnc said, maybe, but Delgado scored the only TD and won fair and square. (I admit that I had the same interpretation of the first video review as dsnc did, but that's neither here nor there.)

 

Delgado got most of the crap he gets from the way he wrestled Megaludis. Yes, he won, but....

 

I don't necessarily have the same point of view as the guys who rant about the stalling in that match, but objectively, it was a hard match to watch given the talent on display. Two of the best wrestlers at any weight square off, and instead of the excitement that one reasonably expected, you had one guy running around all over the mat and another guy on a knee when he wasn't chasing him, and then it was ride-outs. Almost unwatchable.

 

The Garrett match was exciting and action-packed. Very different.

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I do think that the first non-takedown that was video reviewed was a takedown. It happened very fast, but after Delgado tried a leg pass his first roll through was countered and Garrett was behind him and on the side, in a position that I thought constituted control. Delgado had a weak grasp of the leg, but this should have been a TD. Only after Delgado scrambled further was control lost. Control was very brief, but it was there.

 

Coach Smith said in a Flowrestling interview that the exact situation Delgado put himself in should be considered a takedown and back points, and I agree as well. However, for the time being, Delgado on his feet expertly controls the circle, score offensively, scores on reshots, and can stop almost anyone's shot. If next year we end up with rule changes (like this years "Oliver takedown" rule) that limit Delgado's ability to force a stalemate, he'll be in trouble.

 

 

I wonder what Coach Smith feels about the Chris Perry-Mike Evans OT scramble situation...

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Delgado might not make my top2, irregardless of a third title, but who cares what I think?

 

 

1. Stephen Abas/Barry Davis/Gene Mills

4. This is harder to rank than I thought

 

 

Gray Simons and Mike Caruso should be very high on the list. Two 3x ncaa champions. Simons was also a 2x OW at ncaas (91-2). I believe Caruso lost only once. Also 3X champ Greg Johnson.

 

Edit: Rick Sanders too.

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I think the best way would be with a Russian 2 on 1. You could do a split kick, drag, or seatbelt off of it. You hsve to take away his ability to dive underneath to work for a stalemate or scramble for a TD. I'd get old films of the Belaglosov brothers.

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I do think that the first non-takedown that was video reviewed was a takedown. It happened very fast, but after Delgado tried a leg pass his first roll through was countered and Garrett was behind him and on the side, in a position that I thought constituted control. Delgado had a weak grasp of the leg, but this should have been a TD. Only after Delgado scrambled further was control lost. Control was very brief, but it was there.

 

Coach Smith said in a Flowrestling interview that the exact situation Delgado put himself in should be considered a takedown and back points, and I agree as well. However, for the time being, Delgado on his feet expertly controls the circle, score offensively, scores on reshots, and can stop almost anyone's shot. If next year we end up with rule changes (like this years "Oliver takedown" rule) that limit Delgado's ability to force a stalemate, he'll be in trouble.

 

 

I wonder what Coach Smith feels about the Chris Perry-Mike Evans OT scramble situation...

I heard that Coach Smith had mixed emotions about that match.

 

Namely, joy mixed with happiness that Chris won.

.

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Delgado is a stud. people dont like his funk roll leg pass defense and it often appears he gets out wrestled. Well thats folkstyle wrestling for ya.

 

I also think it is pretty funny that people on the Iowa board call his leg pass defense stalling. Lol Delgado scores more from that position than more wrestlers do from there own shots.

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