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New NAIA programs impact on schools?

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Does anyone have any numbers on the impact adding wrestling has had to the tuition paid in or the increase of students on campus as a result of wrestling being added? I am looking for just 3 or 4 examples, not all of them together, but just 3 or 4 schools that have added in the past few years.

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It's been many years ago, but when I coached at a NAIA school I can tell you that we were a huge revenue maker. Our school at the time cost $15,000 a year and we would start the season with a roster of 50 guys. We only had 2.7 scholarships to work with--after you subtracted those, need based aid, the equipment and travel budget, coaching salaries (which were VERY small!), I can tell you that we still brought the school a ton of cash. Our football and basketball programs were fully scholarshipped with huge budgets--wrestling made far more per enrollee than any other sport on campus.

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Its pretty easy to figure out on your own.

 

Find In state/out of state tuition cost=P. Roster size-S. Wrestling budget+scholarship=F. Booster money=B. X=financial gain for the university.

 

P*S-F+B=X.

 

The reaason why wrestling is easier to start at NAIA over NCAA DI is because X is so much more valuable to a small school than a large one when X=less than a couple hundred thousand dollars a year. Large school AD's dont want to allocate resources and time to something with a net gain of say 250k a year when your student base is 20k people. When your student base is 5k, $250k is a nice chunk of money for very little allocation of resources and time.

 

It is a very good reason as an NAIA school to have rosters above 30 guys and a kick ass booster program. That makes dropping your sport a very difficult thing to do when you are pumping $250k into the university at almost no cost.

 

Compare that to basketball/baseball where rosters are 10-15 people and require a facility that costs 1 million dollars to build plus upkeep.

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I started a thread about the new NAIA program at Warner Pacific in Oregon. There have now been 100 new programs added in the last ten years at all levels. The enrollment angle is what is driving this. The numbers of 18 year olds is down and schools need kids. Mike Moyer sells this relentlessly. The actual numbers will vary from school to school but Old Dirty's formula is basically right. The only missing piece is there is very likely a systematic discount from the stated tuition that all schools offer with the amount of the discount dependent on a variety of factors. One Division III coach who I won't name recently told me that his administration was estimating that the wrestling program had added $1.9 million to the school. Now this is a pretty high end academic school with high tuition but the number was impressive. And they were willing to add another part time ass't because of it.

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I started a thread about the new NAIA program at Warner Pacific in Oregon. There have now been 100 new programs added in the last ten years at all levels. The enrollment angle is what is driving this. The numbers of 18 year olds is down and schools need kids. Mike Moyer sells this relentlessly. The actual numbers will vary from school to school but Old Dirty's formula is basically right. The only missing piece is there is very likely a systematic discount from the stated tuition that all schools offer with the amount of the discount dependent on a variety of factors. One Division III coach who I won't name recently told me that his administration was estimating that the wrestling program had added $1.9 million to the school. Now this is a pretty high end academic school with high tuition but the number was impressive. And they were willing to add another part time ass't because of it.

 

Any "high end" academic school would have no problem filling the spots taken by the wrestling program through general admittance. Wrestling is an asset to some NAIA schools because they have trouble recruiting students.

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That is generally right. As I stated earlier and on a number of other threads when we have made these announcements many smaller colleges need enrollment. DII, DIII, NAIA. Mostly private colleges. There may even be some DI colleges concerned about enrollment. But in the particular DIII school I am referencing the coach told me that that is what the administration told HIM. That is how they saw it, not the coach. So in their circumstance they believe he was adding substantial revenue. And this school is a bit of a tweener - high academic standards and high tuition, but not the big time reputation and name recognition of some others. So maybe they have somewhat of an enrollment problem but I am not close enough to the situation to know.

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Any "high end" academic school would have no problem filling the spots taken by the wrestling program through general admittance. Wrestling is an asset to some NAIA schools because they have trouble recruiting students.

 

My understanding is that a lot of smaller liberal arts schools have trouble attracting enough male students to keep a decent gender ratio on campus (more females than males are going to college nowadays and that is more pronounced at those types of schools, and if the balance tilts too far then they have trouble attracting females who don't want to go to what is almost a girls only school). Sports teams are a way to attract males to school. It's like reverse title IX.

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Yes Zeeb I think you are correct here. As far as the Foundation though we are equal opportunity all the way. We want to start programs. Two of the ones we sponsored are men and women. Two are men only. We will do women only. Every one we start moves the ball forward.

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I started a thread about the new NAIA program at Warner Pacific in Oregon. There have now been 100 new programs added in the last ten years at all levels. The enrollment angle is what is driving this. The numbers of 18 year olds is down and schools need kids. Mike Moyer sells this relentlessly. The actual numbers will vary from school to school but Old Dirty's formula is basically right. The only missing piece is there is very likely a systematic discount from the stated tuition that all schools offer with the amount of the discount dependent on a variety of factors. One Division III coach who I won't name recently told me that his administration was estimating that the wrestling program had added $1.9 million to the school. Now this is a pretty high end academic school with high tuition but the number was impressive. And they were willing to add another part time ass't because of it.

 

Any "high end" academic school would have no problem filling the spots taken by the wrestling program through general admittance. Wrestling is an asset to some NAIA schools because they have trouble recruiting students.

 

Not sure why you are singling out NAIA schools for "having trouble recruiting students." This is a nation-wide phenomenon. And it should be acknowledged that many NAIA schools began as small schools with some type religious affiliation; this is the case of the school I coached at. The original intent of the school was never to be big but rather to cater to the educational needs of a very narrow segment of the population. As times changed, they had to broaden the scope of their appeal, with sports being a natural tool to achieve that end. My former school more than doubled its enrollment through athletics--"recruiting students" really wasn't that hard at all.

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Not sure why you are singling out NAIA schools for "having trouble recruiting students." This is a nation-wide phenomenon. And it should be acknowledged that many NAIA schools began as small schools with some type religious affiliation; this is the case of the school I coached at. The original intent of the school was never to be big but rather to cater to the educational needs of a very narrow segment of the population. As times changed, they had to broaden the scope of their appeal, with sports being a natural tool to achieve that end. My former school more than doubled its enrollment through athletics--"recruiting students" really wasn't that hard at all.

 

Was simply responding to a point about "high end" academic schools using wrestling to recruit students, which is not the case. I agree that having athletics is a great way to convince people to attend schools they would otherwise not consider, not just in the NAIA.

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Small, tuition-driven schools are those who are starting wrestling. Many of these schools in Division II, Division III, and NAIA are doing so in order to attract more male students. At a school like DIII Alma College, coached by longtime NCAA DI announcer Todd Hibbs, the 40 or so wrestlers on his team, which started back up in 2011, make up a significant portion of the 1,400 or so undergraduates, and very few, if any of those students would be at the school. In addition, if you multiply those 40 wrestlers times the average net price paid per student of about $21,000, you can see that wrestling brings over $800,000 into the school that it would not otherwise have. If you subtract the coaches salaries, operating budget for wrestling, and marginal cost to educate each student, you can see how the school comes out ahead financially, gets the gender split closer to even, and increases the number of total students.

 

Adding wrestling (and lacrosse and football) is important in order to increase their male enrollment. More women than men are going to college these days, plus we are in the midst of a demographic shift where the sheer number of college age people is on a downward trend. Colleges across the nation, including those with high academic reputations, are seeing a lower number of applications than in the past. The difference with the schools at the top of the college rankings is that they were getting so many applications that losing some does not materially affect them in the same way it does for schools farther down in the rankings. When those schools get a drop in applications, they have trouble filling their beds.

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