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Strength coaches to require certification

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http://www.ncaa.com/news/ncaa/article/2 ... s-athletes

 

It will get lost in the commotion about feeding athletes, but the NCAA Committee also approved a rule requiring strength and conditioning coaches to be certified from a nationally accredited certification body. This, pending approval next week, would not go into effect until the 2015-2016 season, but it will affect the way some teams staff that position. It will no longer be a place to stash an extra coach or a wrestler just out of college who is still training. The person in that position will need to get a certification, which is why the rules implementation was delayed until 2015.

 

Will teams get their guys certified, or will they do what Minnesota does and have four "administrative assistants" on staff? How many words per minute can Zach Sanders, Dustin Schlatter, Joe Nord, and Kevin LeValley type?

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^ This. It really isn't hard to get certified, a few weeks of studying for any college grad should be more than enough time to pass the exam. I don't see this changing things too much, but I certainly think it is a good move and will be beneficial to each team.

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It only said a "nationally accredited" program, in which there are online programs. The only change this will make is that teams will have to pay a $300 fee to online cert companies when AD's wont change the job description funding.

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To all....

The only respected certification is the Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) through the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). This requires at a minimum a Bachelor's degree. There is a 65% Pass rate for first time testers. It is not a "cake walk" as I've known Registered Dieticians (RDs) and even a PhD who have failed it the first time testing. The CSCS certification is the only recognized certification in the NFL, NBA, MLB, and NCAA D1 Football. I'm not sure why a wrestling coach would hire someone who wasn't certified with this credential or accept another "nationally accredited" certification from an online company or weekend course. Just because someone wrestled or played football and "worked out" all thier life...doesn't make them an expert in anatomy, physiology, physics, biomechanics, olympic lifts, or injury prevention/rehabilitation. This isn't basket weaving and although some think it's an easy certification to get...it really isn't. I'm sure many wrestlers who majored in sports medicine, kinesiology, pre-physical therapy, exercise physiology, or maybe even physical education could definitely pass the cert without much difficulty. But to have a "gym rat" who reads Flex, Muscle and Fitness, or any of the other magazines to get information and not read peer-reviewed scientific journals is really setting up the program for failure.

--US Special Forces in Europe Exercise Physiologist, NSCA-CSCS, NASM-CES, ACSM-HFS, USAW-SPC

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Wrestlingfan34 I wish all coaches felt like you and only hired these people but the fact is some D1 coaches don't see that as important as a "wrestling coach" so they will do what they can to get an extra coach. I totally disagree with that and think a certified weight coach is important, but that may be why I don't coach D1?

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http://www.ncaa.com/news/ncaa/article/2014-04-15/ncaa-committee-approves-expanded-meal-allowances-athletes

 

It will get lost in the commotion about feeding athletes, but the NCAA Committee also approved a rule requiring strength and conditioning coaches to be certified from a nationally accredited certification body. This, pending approval next week, would not go into effect until the 2015-2016 season, but it will affect the way some teams staff that position. It will no longer be a place to stash an extra coach or a wrestler just out of college who is still training. The person in that position will need to get a certification, which is why the rules implementation was delayed until 2015.

 

Will teams get their guys certified, or will they do what Minnesota does and have four "administrative assistants" on staff? How many words per minute can Zach Sanders, Dustin Schlatter, Joe Nord, and Kevin LeValley type?

So do they directly report to Ms. Christensen-White or JRob?

 

Mary Christensen-White - Executive Administrative Specialist

Kevin LeValley - Administrative Assistant

Joe Nord - Administrative Assistant

Zach Sanders - Administrative Assistant

Dustin Schlatter - Administrative Assistant

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To all....

The only respected certification is the Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) through the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). This requires at a minimum a Bachelor's degree. There is a 65% Pass rate for first time testers. It is not a "cake walk" as I've known Registered Dieticians (RDs) and even a PhD who have failed it the first time testing. The CSCS certification is the only recognized certification in the NFL, NBA, MLB, and NCAA D1 Football. I'm not sure why a wrestling coach would hire someone who wasn't certified with this credential or accept another "nationally accredited" certification from an online company or weekend course. Just because someone wrestled or played football and "worked out" all thier life...doesn't make them an expert in anatomy, physiology, physics, biomechanics, olympic lifts, or injury prevention/rehabilitation. This isn't basket weaving and although some think it's an easy certification to get...it really isn't. I'm sure many wrestlers who majored in sports medicine, kinesiology, pre-physical therapy, exercise physiology, or maybe even physical education could definitely pass the cert without much difficulty. But to have a "gym rat" who reads Flex, Muscle and Fitness, or any of the other magazines to get information and not read peer-reviewed scientific journals is really setting up the program for failure.

--US Special Forces in Europe Exercise Physiologist, NSCA-CSCS, NASM-CES, ACSM-HFS, USAW-SPC

 

Not true, unless you know something that the NCAA did not report in the new rule language. The language says nothing about a CSCS, although it is the premier cert for S&C coaches. The vergiage was "nationally accredited."

 

The NFPT is nationally acreddited and also accepted by the NCAA for this rule. http://www.nfpt.com/certification

 

This is what kids at Ballys, 24hr, and Curves get to become certified. The program is 100% online and the exam fee is $329.

 

I have a CSCS although I stopped paying dues on it and let it lapse. I would take most wrestlers who get hired as S&C coaches to train my S&C for wrestling than most CSCS who have zero experience in wrestling at all.

 

Wrestlers get hired as S&C coaches because the AD at the university sets the coaches budget and parameters. Each coach has a job description, and that is set up by the AD, not the coach. If the coach wants another coach and can afford one, and the AD has an unfilled coaching spot as an S&C coach, then thats where the guy gets hired.

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To all....

The only respected certification is the Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) through the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). This requires at a minimum a Bachelor's degree. There is a 65% Pass rate for first time testers. It is not a "cake walk" as I've known Registered Dieticians (RDs) and even a PhD who have failed it the first time testing. The CSCS certification is the only recognized certification in the NFL, NBA, MLB, and NCAA D1 Football. I'm not sure why a wrestling coach would hire someone who wasn't certified with this credential or accept another "nationally accredited" certification from an online company or weekend course. Just because someone wrestled or played football and "worked out" all thier life...doesn't make them an expert in anatomy, physiology, physics, biomechanics, olympic lifts, or injury prevention/rehabilitation. This isn't basket weaving and although some think it's an easy certification to get...it really isn't. I'm sure many wrestlers who majored in sports medicine, kinesiology, pre-physical therapy, exercise physiology, or maybe even physical education could definitely pass the cert without much difficulty. But to have a "gym rat" who reads Flex, Muscle and Fitness, or any of the other magazines to get information and not read peer-reviewed scientific journals is really setting up the program for failure.

--US Special Forces in Europe Exercise Physiologist, NSCA-CSCS, NASM-CES, ACSM-HFS, USAW-SPC

 

 

Great post! You are spot on about the "muscle monkeys" who think that because that have "big guns" and looked at a few pictures in body building magazines, they are competent. Just one thing though, I take exception to your comment "maybe even physical education." As a graduate of Springfield College, I can assure you that it won't be a maybe for Springfield alumni!

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