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GranbyTroll

Illegal blast double?

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At Reno Worlds my kid got hit with a penalty point for an illegal blast double (the head in the middle, run through the other guy, Burroughs kind). My kid ran through the double pretty hard and flat backed his opponent, but he didn't pick up the other wrestler and slam him at all; he just ran down the double hard.

 

When I asked the ref about it later, he said that my kid "picked the other boy up [note] and slammed him without regard for his safety," and that the takedown was "essentially a football tackle." The "football tackle" part aptly describes the takedown, but that doesn't seem like a slam to me.

 

Does anyone have insight on this?

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My opinion as a Certified Official in New Jersey and Hawaii is,

The rules say that anytime one wrestler lifts another off the mat ( doesn't matter how high or in what matter) that wrestler is responsible for the "safe return" of the opponent.

As a long-time coach who has worked with wrestlers of all levels, I've had a few that would have such good technique, that they would a actually drive upward so well that both wrestlers actually were off the mat. I have cautioned them on the possibility of it being called a slam.

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If he didn't lift his opponent from the mat, it wasn't a slam.  That doesn't help much, though; "Unnecessary Roughness" is entirely at the judgement of the referee, and there isn't a practical difference between these calls.

What the rules don't say, but which is nonetheless true, is that what referees will regard as "necessary roughness" scales with age (and, to an extent, with the level of competition).  They're more permissive in high school than in 8 & Under, and they're more permissive in college than in high school.  You aren't getting called for a blast double in DI nationals, even if your opponent leaves a hole in the mat.

There is also considerable variation in judgment between individual referees; that's unfortunate, but it's reality.

What I'd emphasize to your athlete would be:

  1. There's nothing wrong with your shot, but you need to learn to scale back the force behind it when necessary.  Eventually, that won't be necessary.
  2. You will always, at every level, need to be able to read the referee, and adjust to circumstances.

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