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Did not wrestle/lost spot Senior year

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With the talk of Gambrall losing his spot in the Hawkeye lineup, can you all name other former AA's or National champs that either did not wrestle their senior year (dropped out,ineligble, injured, etc.) or lost their spot in the lineup?

 

Off the top of my head:

 

Kevin Randleman- dropped out tOS his senior year (?)

 

Wil Kelly- Wartburg's defending D3 national champ comes back 2nd semester Sr. year and loses starting spot

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I've always had a soft spot for seniors. The way I see it they've been on the team for at least 3 years already, many times four and they've busted their ass for all that time. I realize that it's "tough luck" and whatever else people like to label it, but I do feel bad for a guy when he gets beat out by an underclassmen after putting in so much time, sacrifice, dedication and effort.

 

 

The first that comes to mind for me is Nebraska's Joey Malia, who was beat out I believe by Matt Keller. Malia was an NCAA qualifier the year before, and while he wasn't quite AA caliber he did help Nebraska to quite a few dual meet victories.

 

Paul Jenn, who's historically famous for being Cael Sanderson's lone loss on a collegiate mat, was beat out for the varsity position his senior year by Jessman Smith.

 

I don't remember who it was, but Rene Hernandez of Purdue was beat out for varsity his senior season as well. Hernandez was a lot like Malia. A very noteable win, was when he beat out Shawn Bunch at the NCAA's in 2003.

 

 

Ryan L'Amoreaux of Michigan State was another solid wrestler who I believe was beat out by Darren McKnight for varsity his senior year.

 

 

Josh Keefe of Tennessee Chattanooga who had a very promising freshman campaign, including winning the SOCON championship and wins over Johnny Thompson and a few other top notch guys, struggled as a sophomore and then was beat out both his junior and senior seasons by Nebraska transfer Matt Keller.

 

 

Twan Pham of Illinois, who had many wins over top ranked guys including Nick Simmons, Luke Eustice, Bobbe Lowe and a few others was beat out his senior year for varsity by freshman Kyle Ott. Ott did get hurt right before the BIG 10 tournament and Pham filled in for him qualifying for the NCAA's. I think had he wrestled the entire season he would have done better.

 

Anyway, I'll think of more later.

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Daniel Frishkorn beating out Ronnie Delk comes to mind.

And that was on paper too. In the official wrestle off Delk beat Frishkorn in 3-1 s.v. However Frishkorn seemed to do better in competition. I think what really sealed the deal for Frishkorn making team and Delk being left behind was Hofstra's Ricky LaForge. Delk lost to him while Frishkorn tech falled him and pinned him.

 

 

What makes this case even stranger is that Delk could wrestle Teyon Ware extremely tight. Matter of fact, 4 seconds of riding time is the only reason why returning NCAA champion Ware went to the NCAA's in 2003 and why Delk stayed home. Frishkorn couldn't wrestle Ware close at all. Ware would always go out onto the mat and thump him, while Delk took Ware into overtimes and tiebreakers on more than one occasion.

 

I'm sure there is more too it than what meets the eye, but I always felt that comparative results against LaForge is what won Frishkorn the spot.

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Wade Schalles was ruled ineligible to wrestle at the NCAA tournament his senior year due to a transfer ruling. At that time, he was a 40-0, with 1 tie. (The tie occurred when wrestling up a weight class in the Clarion - Iowa dual.)

 

According to the Clarion website, Schalles pinned three NCAA D-1 champs during his senior season. One of them was when Schalles moved up two weight classes to face Bloomsburg's Floyd Hitchcock in the PSAC finals at 177 pounds. A couple of weeks later, Hitchcock was named the Outstanding Wrestler at the 1974 NCAA tournament.

 

Schalles only lost once in his last 3 years of wrestling, during his sophomore year when he went on to win his first NCAA title (and the tournament's Most Outstanding Wrestler Award). I believe that loss also occurred while Schalles was wrestling up a weight class.

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I don't remember if he was a junior or a senior, but Doug Streicher was an AA for Iowa and the next year lost his spot to Terry Steiner.

 

FWIW - Streicher was the high school coach of Jay Borschel and Matt McDonough.

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From memory

 

Chuck Jean, two time NCAA champ and did not wrestle his senior year. He may have ended up in the NAIA for a final season I believe.

 

Brian Ozwalt, 4th his sophomore year and dropped out of school

 

Dean Phinney, 3rd his sophomore year and lost his spot to Lou Banach and left Iowa

 

Andrew Long, took 2nd as a freshman or sophomore, and then found other distracting things to do

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Chuck Jean was quite a character in college. It appears he was expelled from Iowa State for a couple of reasons. Just before winning his second NCAA title, he killed "Old Sammy," a 300-lb, 10-point buck with a pocket knife and butchered Sammy in his dorm room. After that, the game warden started showing up at wrestling practice. Then, shortly after the NCAA tournament, it was reported that he was the ringleader when ISU wrestlers started a fight with black students at a local college watering hole, the Red Ram.

 

Chuck left Iowa State and joined the Army for 18-months. Then he returned to college at Adams State and won two NAIA national championships. So, he's technically a 4-time national college wrestling champion.

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Art Baker went undefeated (with one tie) as a sophomore at Syracuse and captured the 1959 title at 191 pounds. The same year, he played fullback in the backfield with Ernie Davis on a Syracuse team that went 10-0 and was named national champ by all the major polls. He then quit wrestling to concentrate on football. Upon graduating in 1961, he played two years for the Buffalo Bills, followed by four years in the Canadian Football league.

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There were reports that Chuck Jean had to practically be forced out to the mat at 177, several matches after Gable lost to Owings at 142.

 

Chuck Jean was on a first name basis with the Iowa State dean. One of a kind.

 

Wish he'd write a book.

LOL! That would be great. Here's a link to a post that reprints a Minnesota newspaper article that interviewed Chuck Jean about "Old Sammy," the deer. I think you'll enjoy it.

 

Incidentally, after college, he started a roofing business that allowed him to spend the winters as a junior and high school wrestling coach. (Now, I woodn't call you a liar if you said he ain't Kentucky Mudflap, but somebody oughta pore some truth serum down his gullet and find out!)

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There were reports that Chuck Jean had to practically be forced out to the mat at 177, several matches after Gable lost to Owings at 142.

 

Chuck Jean was on a first name basis with the Iowa State dean. One of a kind.

 

Wish he'd write a book.

LOL! That would be great. Here's a link to a post that reprints a Minnesota newspaper article that interviewed Chuck Jean about "Old Sammy," the deer. I think you'll enjoy it.

 

Incidentally, after college, he started a roofing business that allowed him to spend the winters as a junior and high school wrestling coach. (Now, I woodn't call you a liar if you said he ain't Kentucky Mudflap, but somebody oughta pore some truth serum down his gullet and find out!)

 

 

There were reports that Chuck Jean had to practically be forced out to the mat at 177, several matches after Gable lost to Owings at 142.

 

Chuck Jean was on a first name basis with the Iowa State dean. One of a kind.

 

Wish he'd write a book.

LOL! That would be great. Here's a link to a post that reprints a Minnesota newspaper article that interviewed Chuck Jean about "Old Sammy," the deer. I think you'll enjoy it.

 

Incidentally, after college, he started a roofing business that allowed him to spend the winters as a junior and high school wrestling coach. (Now, I woodn't call you a liar if you said he ain't Kentucky Mudflap, but somebody oughta pore some truth serum down his gullet and find out!)

 

Thanks for the link to the story, Hurricane. I'd heard the story about the buck, but not in that detail, and not told by Chuck Jean himself.

 

By the way, Chuck was elected to the Albert Lea High School Hall of Fame this year. He's also a member of the Glen Brand Wrestling Hall of Fame and the Adams State Hall of Fame.

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Nate Parker was an AA for Penn State, then transferred to Oklahoma his senior year and struggled a bit in the lineup. Eventually they pulled the redshirt of Teyon Ware and Parker went to the bench.

 

Nate Parker was never an AA while at Penn State. He placed 5th at the 2002 NCAAs for OU.

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Nate Parker was an AA for Penn State, then transferred to Oklahoma his senior year and struggled a bit in the lineup. Eventually they pulled the redshirt of Teyon Ware and Parker went to the bench.

 

Nate Parker was never an AA while at Penn State. He placed 5th at the 2002 NCAAs for OU.

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Bob Harr, 177 lbs AA for Penn State (1984). Lost starting spot to true freshman Dan Mayo. Moved up to 190 and proceeded to pin Iowa NCAA Champ Best (coming off redshirt) in dual meet (awesome under arm spin move). Got starting job back after Mayo had a serious season ending injury. Repeated as an AA.

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I think there just recently was a 125 lber. named Clarke, who was a national qualifier for ISU, transferred to Iowa, lost a year of eligibility, and then spent his last year behind McDonough at 125 and/or Ramos at 133.

I think you are correct about that. Long was the ISU finalist at 125 that McDonough beat and he transferred to Penn State. He should be a Senior this year.

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I think there just recently was a 125 lber. named Clarke, who was a national qualifier for ISU, transferred to Iowa, lost a year of eligibility, and then spent his last year behind McDonough at 125 and/or Ramos at 133.

I think you are correct about that. Long was the ISU finalist at 125 that McDonough beat and he transferred to Penn State. He should be a Senior this year.

Not correct. Tyler Clark was a two-time NCAA qualifier for ISU, tranferred to UI, did not lose a year of eligibility (he had a RS coming), and wrestled two years behind Ramos.

In the previous post the Iowa wrestler coming off RS in 1984 was Pete Bush, who was national champion in 1982.

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You know this is just the opposite of what you are asking, but it's still a really cool story. Matter of fact, it's probably my favorite wrestling related story.

 

Jamie Heidt was behind Kasey Gillis his senior year. Right before the BIG 10 tournament, Gillis gets hurt and Heidt fills in for him. He goes on to win the BIG 10 championship and earn All American honors with a 8th place finish.

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